Colorado Floodwaters Cover Fracking and Oil Projects

Rebecca Leber

NationofChange.org

Colorado flooding has not only overwhelmed roads and homes, but also the oil and gas infrastructure stationed in one of the most densely drilled areas in the U.S. Although oil companies have shut down much of their operations in Weld County due to flooding, nearby locals say an unknown amount of chemicals has leaked out and possibly contaminated waters, mixing fracking fluids and oil along with sewage, gasoline, and agriculture pesticides.

“You have 100, if not thousands, of wells underwater right now and we have no idea what those wells are leaking,” East Boulder County United spokesman Cliff Willmeng said Monday. “It’s very clear they are leaking into the floodwaters though.”

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Colorado Floods Spur Fracking Concerns

CBSnews.com

The devastating flooding that pummeled Colorado the past week, also inundated a main center of the state's drilling industry, temporarily bringing production of natural gas to a halt.

The mix of floodwaters and drilling operations has also spurred environmental and health concerns that industry and government officials say they are closely monitoring, and that activists have seized on as another demonstration of the dangers posed by hydraulic-fracturing.

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Senator Pavley's Response to LA Times editorial

Re "A fracking bill gone bad," Editorial, Sept. 12

As the author of SB 4, I would like to clarify how the bill would work.

Currently, fracking and acidizing occur in California without regulations or oversight. The bill requires an independent scientific study and mandates that oil companies obtain a permit before fracking and acidizing, notify neighbors, monitor groundwater and disclose all chemicals and well locations online.

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A Fracking Bill Gone Bad - LA Times

Key regulatory elements of SB 4, passed by the Assembly, have been so watered down as to be useless.

by The Times Editorial Board

Some level of regulation of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is preferable to none. Except if the helpful aspects are canceled out by more problematic ones. That is the case with SB 4, passed by the Assembly on Wednesday. It goes back to the state Senate for final vote, and we hope it's stopped there. If not, Gov. Jerry Brown should veto it.

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